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Interview with a newly-minted Scrum Master

Six months ago SilverStripe, an open-source Content Management System provider and Wellington web agency approached me to help them improve the way in which they deliver client and open source projects, increase employee happiness and, in general, just do the best possible job. To achieve this, we decided to move away from the existing Agile-like (fixed scope/fixed price) approach and introduce Scrum with its focus on client-driven iterations, early feedback and continuous improvement.

Silverstripe have asked me to interview some of their staff about the transition to Agile. The original posts can be found on Silverstripe’s blog (Sam MinnéeAleksandra Brewer), below are selected highlights from the interviews. 

A template for the sprint review

Conducting an interesting and engaging end-of-sprint review is an often overlooked art: Not only do we want to show what we have built during the last sprint and collect feedback and good ideas for what to build next; we also want to give our audience a good experience. 

At my workplace we always invite the entire company and often have more than 30 people in the room. As they claim to be happy and to enjoy the fortnightly experience I thought it might be useful to share our template and some guidelines for what is working for us.

Why being a Scrum Master is a full time job

An adequate Scrum Master can handle two or three teams at the time; a great one can only handle one”. (Michael James – An Example Scrum Master’s checklist)

I found that organisations, teams and new Scrum Masters (even freshly certified ones) often aren’t sure what the Scrum Master role entails and what value it provides. 

Here is my attempt to summarize what a good Scrum Master does:
 

The Scrum Master role

Some teams are like symphony orchestras, so they need a leader who keeps everyone on the same sheet of music. Conductors have to be deeply familiar with each instrument and with the music, yet they don’t play in the band or tell the musicians what to do. They let the music provide detailed guidance; their job is to bring out the best in the musicians, both individually and as a group.” (Mike Cohn – Succeeding with Agile)“A Scrum Master is like a conductor coordinating the efforts of musicians, helping them to play together. Some teams are like jazz bands, so they need a leader who encourages improvisation.


 In general the Scrum Master …

 

  • makes sure the team is running (good) Agile development
  • assists team members in adopting and improving Agile Development
  • helps the team maximise throughput and to work in the best possible way