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When the coach needs to go

“When you need me but do not want me, then I must stay. When you want me but no longer need me, then I have to go.”
— Nanny McPhee (via Lyssa Adkins

I am an Agile coach and the goal of my job is to put myself out of a job. 

My mission is to teach people Agile and to make sure they understand and correctly apply Agile values, principles, frameworks and techniques. This is quite a big deal as Agile often forces us to change the way we work on a daily basis; how we organise our work, how we collaborate, which tasks we perform and how we communicate with each other and the rest of the organisation.

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Kanban is not for the Idle or Newbies

For four of my six and a half Agile years I was solidly in the Scrum camp, Lean, in my opinion, was already part of Scrum and its influence made Scrum even better. I don’t think that any Agile practice is for the work shy and there is a lot of personal courage needed to get any practice working well. Many people call Kanban an evolutionary rather than revolutionary process (my disagreement of this bland throw away statement will be in a later post), and I think this allows too many people keep the dinosaurs roaming the earth, if the mass extinction event has just happened then apart from the obvious sense of loss , at least you have an empty playing field to start from. Scrum at least with its slightly more prescriptive approach gives you somewhere to start.

About two years ago Kanban for software finally entered my Agile sphere. I initially relegated it to the ideal-for-support-teams division, and sneered at the new kid on the block. But time spent seeing Kanban in action and listening to the wise words of people like Gareth Evans (understanding the cost of delay was a revelation for me)  and presentations including “Agile isn’t the point, better is the point,” by Michael Bromley, made me think about Kanban in a more positive light.